Azure Data Studio – Server Management

Let’s look at how you can connect to your servers and group them up using Azure Data Studio. 

You’ll see down the left navigation bar. The icon we care about is at the top and will take you to the servers area of the app.

You may as well jump in and connect a server to see what it’s like.

You’ll be given a connection popup. Assuming you can connect using Windows credentials then you’ll just need to put the name of your instance in the server box.

You’ll see the connection appear in your server list. Have a click around, you can see the databases, security and database objects, you’ll be used to these from SSMS.

You’ll be able to connect to all of your servers here, just add them one at a time.

Once you’ve added a few you will probably notice you’ll want to start organising them into folders. Go ahead and add a new server group.

You get to choose a name for the group as well as a description that pops up like a tooltip. You also get to choose a funky colour for it too

Personally, I’ve separated out Live from Dev from QA but do whatever is best in your environment.

If you have instances stacked on the same box then you can create subfolders for these. Just drag and drop folders within folders and instances in those folders.

Look at that, all pretty and organised.

What is Your “Why?”

This month Andy Leonard has asked What is Your “Why”?.

Well, here’s my Why.

I love SQL Server and the community that surrounds it. It’s so welcoming, open and accessable.

I’ve had a sort of organic progression of Microsoft products in my career. I’ve gone Excel Developer -> Access Developer -> SQL Server Developer -> SQL Server DBA (there’s some other products in there like SSRS but that’s the main path). I’ve never really felt comfortable with any of the communities around these other products but SQL Server is a different kettle of fish completely.

Finding the SQL Server Community slack channel was a great thing. I am the only DBA where I am (with loads of developers) and having people to chat to about DBA stuff is such a pressure release.

Also, check out the call for speakers at most conferences. It’s not unusual to have a ‘first timers’ track for people who want to get into speaking. Doing this isn’t a necessity but it shows how inclusive the community is.

I didn’t choose to stay with SQL Server because of the technology specifically (although I do enjoy focusing on performance tuning) but rather the community around it.

Generate Test Data with Faker & Python within SQL Server

Make sure you’ve done these steps first

  1. You’ve installed SQL Server with Python
  2. You’ve then installed pip
  3. You’ve also installed Pandas using pip

Then let’s get started

We’re going to use a Python library called Faker which is designed to generate test data. You’ll need to open the command line for the folder where pip is installed. In my standard installation of SQL Server 2019 it’s here (adjust for your own installation);

C:\Program Files\Microsoft SQL Server\MSSQL15.SQL2019PYTHON\PYTHON_SERVICES\Scripts

From here you want to run the following command to install mimesis;

Once it’s done we’ve got it installed, we can open SSMS and get started with our test data.

We’re going to get started with the sample queries from the official documentation but we have to add a print statement to see our results because we’re using SSMS;

If you run this in SSMS you’ll see the output in the messages window

This guy loves quality legwear

Now we know that works, let’s put this into a useable format within SQL Server.

This is going to be our block of Python;

For the purposes of this example, we’re going to make a temp table to store the data and view what we’ve done. Wrapping this python script into t-sql will give us an output like so;

Go ahead and run it, you should see a sample of 100 names and addresses that are currently stored in your temp table;

There are far more options when using Faker. Looking at the official documentation you’ll see the list of different data types you can generate as well as options such as region specific data.

Go have fun trying this, it’s a small setup for a large amount of time saved.

Azure Data Studio Themes

This is one of the features of Azure Data Studio that is great for accessibility as well as just being cool.

The default theme is your basic light theme. It’s fine but this isn’t the only theme you have to use.

Use Ctrl+k Ctrl+t to open the theme options.

Have a click through and see how they look when you’re editing code. It’s a case of choosing something that suits your style. My preference is the default dark theme but go nuts and choose one you like.

Oh, and if you’re a sadist, check out the Red theme